PERFORMING ARTS AND SPORT FACULTY

Head of Faculty: Mrs R Carey rachel.carey@castlephoenixtrust.org.uk

Deputy Head of Faculty: Miss A Young abi.young@castlephoenixtrust.org.uk

Drama

  • Mrs R Carey

Introduction

Drama is an explorative and creative subject, where pupils learn about topics, through practical study. They learn about real life issues and the world around them, exploring a range of characters and situations, both factual and fictional. Pupils learn how to use techniques to structure meaningful drama and practise the tools of play writing, designing and directing. They study plays from different genres and time periods, learning about theatre history along the way.

Why it is important to study drama?

Drama is predominantly a practical subject, where pupils work collaboratively, in a safe and creative environment. It is a subject that develops and stretches social skills, communication and confidence; vital for any future career. Drama has a cross-curricular nature, linking closely with English, History, Art, Media and PSHE. Pupils studying drama develop a solid grasp of empathy and understanding of others in the world.

Year 7

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Drama Techniques:
Exploring the main techniques for structuring a piece of drama – Still Image, Thought tracking, Narration, Flashback, Split Scene & Slow Motion
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_7_Drama_Techniques
Status:
Exploring stereotype and characterisation of stock characters
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_7_Status
Script – The Terrible Fate of Humpty Dumpty:
Exploring the structure of script and the theme of bullying
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_7_Script
Greek Theatre:
Exploring theatre history through myths and legends

Year 8

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Melodrama:
Exploring the genre of melodrama and stock characters of hero, villain and damsel-in-distress
Knowledge Organiser – Year 8 Melodrama
Vocal Skills:
Exploring the capacity of voice, vocal skills and soundscape
Shakespeare:
Exploring the language and key scenes of Romeo & Juliet, The Tempest & Macbeth
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_8_Shakespeare
Script – Missing Dan Nolan:
Issue based drama exploring Verbatim Theatre

Year 9

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Blood Brothers:
Script based unit exploring page to stage
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_9_Theatre_Styles
Theatre Styles:
Exploring Physical Theatre, Verbatim Theatre & Brechtian style
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_9_Theatre_Styles
Live Theatre Review:
Theory unit exploring theatre roles and how a production is staged

Year 10

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Improvisation:
Introductory unit to GCSE course, exploring, genre, structure and form
Knowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_10_Improvisation
Stanislavski:
Exploring theatre history and the creation of a ‘truthful’ character
Component 3: An Inspector CallsKnowledge_Organiser_Drama_Year_11_Text_in_Performance
Component 1: Devised Theatre

Year 11

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Component 1: Performance Exam and Portfolio
Component 2: Text in Performance:
Preparation of monologues and duologues
Component 3: Exam Preparation:
Revisit set text and review live theatre

Physical Education

Introduction

The Physical Education department has the following aims:

  • To encourage pupils to develop physical, cognitive, social and emotional skills across a range of sport and physical activity.
  • To encourage all pupils to develop physical competence and enable them to engage in worthwhile physical activities
  • To equip pupils with the knowledge and understanding of competition through in house activities and extra-curricular fixtures and competitions.
  • To gain an understanding and knowledge of health and wellbeing, the importance that physical education plays within health and wellbeing and promote lifelong participation within sport and physical activity.

Why it is important to study PE & Sport?

The curriculum aims to develop pupils’ knowledge and understanding of the skills required in sports, with tactics and composition as well as pupils’ understanding of a healthy, active lifestyle. One of the core aims is to encourage pupils to experience new activities and sports, and to develop an enjoyment for participating in sporting activities. Pupils are taught how to acquire and develop skills, how to select and apply skills in a game environment, how to evaluate their own performance and the performance of others as well as decision making. Pupils are taught to develop their roles as participants, officials, umpires and team leaders where teamwork, communication and leadership skills are key.

Key Stage 3 (Year 7 to Year 9)

In Key Stage 3, pupils are timetabled for two, one-hour lessons of PE per week. The activities that are listed below will be expected to be taught throughout KS3 with Years 7 and 8 taking part in swimming. The skills that are developed throughout these lessons will provide opportunity to further develop understanding and application.  Lessons are broken down into stages so that pupils can: ‘develop and apply skills’, learn ‘decision making’, ‘evaluate and improve performance’ and ‘show leadership’.
All year groups are given the opportunity to compete competitively within their core PE lessons, which specifically runs interhouse competition in the last week of term.

Practical Units Covered:

  • Invasion Games (Football/Rugby/Basketball)
  • Net Games (Tennis/Badminton/Netball)
  • Striking and Fielding (Rounders/Softball/Cricket)
  • Health Related Fitness- Including fitness testing
  • Gymnastics
  • Trampoline
  • Athletics (throwing/jumping/running events)
  • Dance
  • Outdoor Adventurous Activity
  • Swimming (Year 7 and 8 only)

Year 7 and 8

In Years 7 and 8, pupils will engage in two one-hour lessons of PE per week, with some groups taking part in swimming as one of their lessons. 

Throughout the year, pupils experience a variety of sports to enhance, develop and improve their physical ability. Further to this, pupils work to develop their cognitive ability through the “thinking assessments”. Pupils are given a half termly quiz whereby they must complete a range of multiple choice, single sentence, and extended writing pieces of work. This is then marked, and feedback is provided before a final attempt which is then assessed. Students will then receive a physical and thinking grade which contributes to their overall grade in PE.

Through this process, it enables pupils to gain confidence, knowledge and understanding of the technical and tactical requirements of each sport and activity in greater depth. Although pupils follow a similar scheme, sports will differ between the two year groups.

Year 9

In year 9 pupils continue to develop their ability within PE with two, one-hour lessons per week. The focus for this year group is to build and apply their skills into more advanced application in game, competitive environments. In addition, pupils will work to develop their cognitive ability through the “thinking assessments”. Pupils are given a half-termly quiz whereby they must complete a range of multiple choice, single sentence, and extended writing pieces of work. This is then marked, and feedback is provided before a final attempt which is then assessed. Students will then receive a physical and thinking grade which contributes to their overall grade in PE. Pupils are also introduced to elements of the KS4 option subject to allow them to prepare for the subject should they choose it.

Year 10 and 11

At KS4 PE core lessons are one hour long. During this time pupils are given the opportunity to choose a pathway for participation. Options given are there to enable pupils the opportunity to further develop competence, accuracy, precision, control and originality across a range of sports.

Pupils will need to critically analyse performance and demonstrate that they understand how skills, tactics, compositional principles and levels of fitness relate to the quality and effectiveness of a performance. Pupils begin to use their understanding of physical competence, high-quality performance and balanced, healthy lifestyles to select the roles and activities they wish to get involved in.  They then pursue this regularly in school through the curriculum choices offered and are also encouraged to participate out of school in local and national sport, dance and healthy physical activity programme understanding of physical competence, high-quality performance and balanced, healthy lifestyles to select the roles and activities they wish to get involved in.  They then pursue this regularly in school through the curriculum choices offered and are also encouraged to participate out of school in local and national sport, dance and healthy physical activity programmes.

The emphasis at KS4, is that all pupils will make an informed choice about the activity areas that they wish to follow.  Throughout the key stage, the concept of ‘Sports Education’ will form the basis for many lessons, with all pupils getting the opportunity to perform in competitive situations and take on different roles in sport and exercise that interest them.


Each unit of work will be taught over a half term (6 lessons) with assessment and monitoring carried out in the same way as with Key Stage 3.  Although this assessment does not lead to any formal qualifications it does allow pupils and teachers to monitor progress, fitness and levels of participation.

Useful links

See Knowledge organisers for various sports and activities.

Useful Links

MUSIC

Ms L Franks louise.franks@castlephoenixtrust.org.uk

Introduction

In the words of Albert Einstein: “The greatest scientists are artists as well”. Music is kind of like part art, part science! Which means it will help you build your problem solving, research, planning, analytical and critical thinking skills, as well as develop your creativity.

Why it is important to study music?

Making music can help a young person maintain good mental health during a time of high pressure.

Music is an academic subject in its own right, but it actually benefits other subjects too.

A recent study in the UK found that playing a musical instrument appears to enhance general performance in other subjects at GCSE

1. Other studies have shown that music benefits learning by activating all areas of the brain

2: Auditory (sound processing); motor (rhythm processing); and limbic (emotions).

So by choosing music, your child could actually be improving their chances of doing well in their other subjects .

It will provide transferable skills

GCSE music involves written, analytical, practical and social/personal skills such as:

  • Independent learning: having to be disciplined about practising on their instrument or voice
  • Team working: particularly if they’re involved in weekly groups or ensembles, concerts and performances
  • Performance and presentation skills which are useful for any job/career
  • Listening: this is highly developed in musicians and it is an important part of the course
  • Analytical and essay-writing skills
  • Confidence and self-esteem: which has a knock-on effect in all areas of life and learning
  • Creativity and self-expression: helping young people to think differently and harness the power of their imagination
  • Both employers and universities see
  • Creative subjects as assets.
  • Increasingly, employers and universities are looking for young people who have skills that are learned through creative subjects: creative thinking, emotional intelligence, adaptability, communication and tenacity to name just a few4. And universities are keen to attract students who have a well-rounded education and achieve good results, no matter what the subject.